Not to toot my own horn but….

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I would like to thank ACRE magazine for featuring us in their February pulbication. And I would like to send a very special thank you to Linda Williams for writing such a beautiful article.

 

Also today I was on Central PA live again to demonstrate our farmer’s market feature here is the just in case you missed it-

http://www.wearecentralpa.com/story/d/story/taste-of-the-alleghenies/19630/CsZP8E4ie0Ki8aeGtvtcsg

Here is the recipe that we’ll be using on Central PA live and Taste of the Alleghenies

Sausage Apple Chutney Crostini

1 Baguette from Goodness Grows

1/4 cup of Clover Creek Shredded Cheddar Cheese

1/2 pound of Sausage from Greener Acres Farm

2 cups of Apple Chutney (see recipe below)

Brown sausage and combine with chutney and heat to 150 degrees.   Slice bread into 1″ discs and toast in the toaster.   Top the toast with 1 heaping tablespoon of chutney and sausage mix and sprinkle shredded cheddar cheese on top of the warm chutney mix.   Enjoy!

Apple Chutney

2 cups apple cider vinegar
2 cups sugar

1 1/2 pounds tart green apples (such as Granny Smith from Christmas Valley Tree Farm), peeled, cored, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
10 large garlic cloves
1 2-ounce piece fresh ginger, peeled, coarsely chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper (from Goodness Grows)
1 1/2 cups (packed) golden raisins
2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds

DIRECTIONS:

Bring vinegar and sugar to boil in heavy large nonaluminum saucepan, stirring until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

Toss apples and lemon juice in large bowl. Combine garlic, ginger, salt and red pepper in processor; blend until finely chopped. Add apple and garlic mixtures, raisins and mustard seeds to vinegar. Simmer until apples are tender and chutney thickens, stirring occasionally, about 45 minutes. Place in bowl. Cool. Cover; chill. (Can be made 1 week ahead. Keep chilled.)

 

 

Bringing in the New Year Tomatoes

Yes, Tomatoes in January

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Along with some Jerusalem Artichokes, Radicchio Kale, Turnips, Radishes, Lettuce, Pea Shoots, Violas, Cilantro and more. Also, our goats have begun kidding, no kidding, having their babies which means MILK!!!!!   I am getting ready for some classes beginning in February for soap making, cheese making and maple syrup making too!   Stayed tuned in our upcoming events page.

Our hens are slowly starting to lay eggs again, so happy to have eggs again!

Also we have updated our winter share agreements, they are worth a look!   Please note that our winter shares drop off every other week, so you will get more per pick up and pick up less often. We are considering doing this with our half shares during the summer, so I will be paying special attention to feedback from the winter experience:)

We will have an article in Acre Magazine on our farm coming up in February I think too, so keep your eyes open for that!

We will be going on vacation from January 16- 24, but we do have our very knowledgeable apprentice Derek, Kate and Karen on duty to help with all of your farm needs!

 

 

Whatcha got going on these days?

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Where can we be found this December?

Check us out the these great locations :

Wednesdays- Under the Son on 11 North Liberty Street Cumberland, MD 21502 4:30 – 6:00 pm

Thursdays- Wehnwood Untied Methodist Church 2511 Juniata Gap Rd Altoona, PA  2:00pm- 5:30pm

Fridays- Station Medical Center Altoona PA 10:00 am- 2:00pm  December 6, 20

Fridays- Wholesome Living Marketplace 3:30-5:00pm

Saturdays- Mountain City Traditional Arts Frostburg, MD 10:00am- 2:00pm December 7, 21

 

We’ll see you there!

 

Wreaths that make me say “Hello Winter”

We are definitely shifting gears for the holiday season.   Now that it’s colder out, we have been baking lots more, getting our turkeys ready for Monday, and starting to make wreaths for some winter cheer!    The wreaths that we normally do are total mixes of all natural, fresh picked greens.   I like to throw in herbs such as artemesia, lavender, rosemary and thyme for fragrance and color.   Our american holly trees had a great year this year, and are loaded with beautiful plump red berries.

 

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We use juniper for garland, just because it makes a nice, flexible and full band.   Also, we use “machines” to make the wreaths and garland.   The tools are not electric powered, and are rather primitive, but work fine for the amount that we make.   We are making garland to order and 10 and 16 inch wreaths.   We are taking orders for different sizes, but these are the most common.

 

While making the wreaths, we use several different tree varieties.   This makes our wreaths ornate, without the use of a bow.

Wreath

 

But if bells and bows are more your style, then by all means:

Wreath with bow

 

If you want to come see us this winter, this is our winter season schedule:

Under The Son Wed 4:30- 6pm
11 North Liberty St Cumberland
Wehnwood United Methodist
Altoona Thursdays 2-5:30pm
Station Medical Center Every other Friday
Altoona Beginning November 7th 10am-2pm
Mountain City Traditional Arts Frostburg, MD
November 1,15 December 6,20 10am-1pm

We won’t be at markets the week of Thanksgiving and Christmas, but you may order and pick up baked goods and farm products at the farm.

I hope to see you this week!

Soup Salad and Sandwich Saturday

As temperature plummeted across our region, and winter markets are picking up, I’m more in the mood for soup.   Saturdays are the perfect day for us because I only need to cook once for 2-3 meals over the weekend.   This week I made chicken and white bean chili using a slightly modified Food Network recipe, salad from the veggies that we didn’t sell at Wholesome Living Market Place today and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on our own spelt bread.

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I used the following recipe for the White Chicken Chili with some modifications-

I use real chicken, not ground chicken, I didn’t add corn and I did add cilantro.

The salad came back from a small indoor market that Rob went to today.   It has romaine, green leaf, red leaf and arugula from our gardens.   Also I chopped 2 carrots and 5 radishes on top.   The cheese is from a trade I made with High Country Creamery today at the Mountain City Traditional Arts Market.

The sandwich is made with our very own Spelt bread, fresh ground honey roasted peanut butter from Fisher’s Country Store.   Also the boysenberry jelly was made by my boys’ old babysitter Rachel Bender.   She owns Summer Kitchen Jams and you can purchase her wonderful creations there.

I hope all of you will consider continuing your commitment to buy locally this winter!   There are so many wonderful foods available from local producers this time of year too.   I will do my best to help you all find out what’s available.

 

Baked Salmon with Tomatillo Relish

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Baked Salmon With Tomatillo Relish

1 side of wild alaskan salmon

1/2 pint of tomatillos dehusked and chopped

1 teaspoon sea salt

1 T lime juice

2 T fresh cilantro chopped

 

Place salmon on a baking sheet, skin side down.   Combine tomatillos, seasalt, lime juice and cilantro and spoon on top of salmon.   Bake at 400 for 20 minutes or until salmon meat flakes with a fork.

 

 

Super easy meal for a crowd!

Heirloom Tomato Salsa

 

Heirloom Tomato Salsa

Today I made salsa from some of the garden goodies our crew picked.

 

Heirloom Tomato Salsa

 

Heirloom Tomato Salsa

  • Three Houseworth Tomatoes
  • Three Black Prince Tomatoes
  • 2 Pineapple Tomatoes
  • 1 pint of Bell Star Tomatoes
  • 1 Pint of Tomatillos
  • 3 Carmen Peppers
  • 3 lunchbox Snack Peppers
  • 2 Pimiento peppers
  • 3 sweet onions
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 2 left over corn on the cob, cut off the cob
  • 2 Tablespoons of lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt

Chop all ingredients into 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch pieces and toss with lime juice and salt.   Serve chilled.

 

I only wish I had some cilantro to go with this recipe!   It is really hard for me to have cilantro the same time as my tomatoes, peppers and tomatillos, but its coming.  Cilantro likes cool weather, while all of the other salsa ingredients like it hot.  We had cilantro at the beginning of the summer, but as does the lettuce, it bolts and nothing until it cools down again.    I planted cilantro at the beginning of the month, and just transplanted it to the ground last Sunday.   Maybe next week we’ll see some of it harvested.

 

Tuesday is a big picking day at the farm, so if anyone is looking to get some volunteer time in at the farm, Tuesdays are oipen for farm help!   Email me if you are interested!

 

Also we are planning our farm to table dinner for the third week of October.   We plan to have our pig roast with live entertainment by “The Canned Hams” more news to follow as the event unfolds!

 

See you this week!

 

Dawn